Raven’s Night 2015

Sarah here. As I’ve mentioned before, one of my other creative outlets is tribal fusion bellydance. Every year just before Halloween, my teacher produces a show/event called Raven’s Night. Each year has a different theme (this year was Supernatural), and dancers from all over come to perform. The audience is encouraged to dress up in their finest steampunk, goth, or otherwise fantastical attire. It’s always a blast and a rich feast for the eyes and ears.

This year I performed in my teacher’s piece, so I was too distracted to take pictures. Andrew, however, was tasked to photograph the pre-show festivities, and since he was there and had a camera, he shot the show as well. He edited the pre-show pictures himself, but as is our usual arrangement for dance events, he handed the raw image files from the show over to me to process. Considering how dark the theater is, how much the color and intensity of the stage lighting changes, and how quickly the performers move, taking good pictures is no easy feat. Andrew always does a great job… and I’ve dragged him to enough shows over the years that he’s developed a knack for catching dramatic moments.

Raven’s Night pictures are a treat to play with, since the performances and costumes are so dramatic and full of intense energy. This year we had a multi-sword-wielding Celtic goddess, banshees, angels, vampires, a truly epic take on Michael Jackson’s Thriller, and many other awesome pieces.

You can see the full gallery of pre-show pictures here, and show pictures here.

Advertisements

Look to the Right

Andrew here. Last month, my brother and I took a trip to Mt. Rainier, Washington. This is a favorite destination of ours when out West, and this year we got to spend a couple of nights on the mountain. This also meant we got a couple of sunrises and, since my brother is himself an excellent photographer, it wasn’t too hard to convince him to get up at dawn and visit the famous Reflection Lakes.

We got up before sunrise, as landscape photographers are cursed to do, and were in place when the sun hit the mountain. We had uncharacteristically clear skies both mornings, which meant almost no clouds to catch the morning light and color. While we did get some good reflection shots, I took a more important lesson away from this opportunity: Even if you know what you’re there to shoot, keep your eyes open.

This shot of the treeline and rising sun reflected in the lake is the result of looking to my right, away from the mountain, and realizing this was the shot that really made the most of the atmosphere and light at that moment. I did take shots of Mt. Rainier reflected in the still waters of the lake, but the fact that you’re seeing this shot first should tell you something — the famous scene you went there to shoot isn’t always going to be your favorite shot of the visit, so keep your eyes peeled for what else is around you. You might be surprised.