Tag Archives: photography

Raven’s Night 2015

Sarah here. As I’ve mentioned before, one of my other creative outlets is tribal fusion bellydance. Every year just before Halloween, my teacher produces a show/event called Raven’s Night. Each year has a different theme (this year was Supernatural), and dancers from all over come to perform. The audience is encouraged to dress up in their finest steampunk, goth, or otherwise fantastical attire. It’s always a blast and a rich feast for the eyes and ears.

This year I performed in my teacher’s piece, so I was too distracted to take pictures. Andrew, however, was tasked to photograph the pre-show festivities, and since he was there and had a camera, he shot the show as well. He edited the pre-show pictures himself, but as is our usual arrangement for dance events, he handed the raw image files from the show over to me to process. Considering how dark the theater is, how much the color and intensity of the stage lighting changes, and how quickly the performers move, taking good pictures is no easy feat. Andrew always does a great job… and I’ve dragged him to enough shows over the years that he’s developed a knack for catching dramatic moments.

Raven’s Night pictures are a treat to play with, since the performances and costumes are so dramatic and full of intense energy. This year we had a multi-sword-wielding Celtic goddess, banshees, angels, vampires, a truly epic take on Michael Jackson’s Thriller, and many other awesome pieces.

You can see the full gallery of pre-show pictures here, and show pictures here.

Advertisements

Look to the Right

Andrew here. Last month, my brother and I took a trip to Mt. Rainier, Washington. This is a favorite destination of ours when out West, and this year we got to spend a couple of nights on the mountain. This also meant we got a couple of sunrises and, since my brother is himself an excellent photographer, it wasn’t too hard to convince him to get up at dawn and visit the famous Reflection Lakes.

We got up before sunrise, as landscape photographers are cursed to do, and were in place when the sun hit the mountain. We had uncharacteristically clear skies both mornings, which meant almost no clouds to catch the morning light and color. While we did get some good reflection shots, I took a more important lesson away from this opportunity: Even if you know what you’re there to shoot, keep your eyes open.

This shot of the treeline and rising sun reflected in the lake is the result of looking to my right, away from the mountain, and realizing this was the shot that really made the most of the atmosphere and light at that moment. I did take shots of Mt. Rainier reflected in the still waters of the lake, but the fact that you’re seeing this shot first should tell you something — the famous scene you went there to shoot isn’t always going to be your favorite shot of the visit, so keep your eyes peeled for what else is around you. You might be surprised.

Backyard Nature

HummyZinnia

Andrew here. Wildlife photographers typically make landscape photographers (who famously have to be in crazy places before the sun rises for the best shots) look like they have an easy time. Wildlife photography often involves hauling huge (and incredibly expensive) equipment into remote places and waiting… and watching… and following, and studying… and waiting. And did I mention waiting? And hauling? Not that I have any objection to hauling and waiting and watching… But that doesn’t always have to be the way it’s done.

We live in a pretty urban area on the edge of Washington D.C., but this year we decided to tailor our garden habitat to support (and attract!) the local fauna. This has allowed me to literally practice my photography from my living room.

Now, I’m not going to be getting any world class images of bears flipping salmon out of the river or the sun rising through moose antlers from my backyard, but if you’re interested in practicing your wildlife photography skills and learning to appreciate the surprising amount of beautiful wildlife where you already live, I highly recommend it.

Nom

A few tips:

– Find out what native plants support interesting wildlife where you live (milkweed for butterflies, for example, which need all the help they can get these days).

– Arrange the planting so you can at least see it from inside your house if at all possible. If not, consider building in a space to put an outdoor chair where you can comfortably watch from far enough away not to disturb, but close enough to photograph.

– Don’t overestimate your lens’ reach. Take some test shots from your vantage point before you plant everything to make sure you’ll be able to see what you want to see.

– Plan your backdrops. A beautiful hummingbird with a trashcan in the background probably won’t be the image you want. Consider planting flowers far enough in front of solid greenery that you get a nice solid, not-distracting background.

– Be patient and learn the behavior of your visitors once they arrive. You’ll start to see patterns of where birds land, and how the butterflies choose flowers. You don’t have to chase them around with your lens if you can anticipate where they’ll likely land. You can even build in perches to encourage them to choose certain places in easy reach for you.

This is a great opportunity to hone your photographic skills and support your local wildlife at the same time. There are lots of resources out there (including a great class by Moose Peterson on KelbyOne) on how to take great backyard wildlife photos. You never know what you’ll find right in your backyard, and you’ll learn good skills before you go trekking out into the wilderness!

HummyLantana

It’s Full of Stars

Andrew here. Sometimes you don’t have to go as far away as you think to get something interesting.

I live a few minutes outside Washington D.C. For years, I’ve wanted to try my hand at photographing the night sky and Milky Way, but there’s far too much light pollution where I live. All my travels over the past few years have been to other urban areas or to remote areas that were completely clouded over at night (with the incredibly fortunate exception of our one aurora night in Iceland last March), so I’ve just never had a good opportunity to try to see the Milky Way.

This summer, a couple of my photographer friends decided to visit Shenandoah National Park in Virginia and came back with some great night sky shots. This past weekend, I joined them.

It was amazing to be less than two hours from D.C. and able to see the Milky Way with my naked eye. There was some city glow in the distance and some hazy fog along the horizon, but there was no question what I was seeing up above.

There are many websites with detailed guides to shooting the night sky, so I’m not going to try to recreate those here, but here are a few quick tips:

– Use a program like Stellarium to find out when you’ll have the Milky Way visible where you’ll be, and what the sun and moon cycles will be like to get good, dark skies.

– Scout ahead of time – having a clear view of the night sky is easy enough in most places, but if you want any other compositional elements (and just for safety) it’s good to scout out the area before it gets dark.

– Use a headlamp with a red filter to help you work in the dark. The red filter will help protect your night vision and the headlamp means you’ll have your hands free.

– You will, of course, need a good tripod and a wide aperture, wide angle lens for best results. That said, you can do some creative things with other lenses, so if you don’t have the “right” one, give it a go anyway.

– Finally, focus on a light in the far distance (or focus on something far away if it’s still light out) and lock your focus in place by turning off autofocus and taping your focus ring in place with gaffer’s tape. (I failed to do the latter part and it cost me a lot of shots when I apparently bumped the focus just slightly at some point.) Just racking the lens to infinity usually doesn’t quite get you where you need to be on most lenses.

For more details on planning your trip, Dave Morrow has a great three part tutorial on Youtube here. It’s very worth checking out if you’re planning your first shot at the Milky Way.

One last recommendation: Make sure to put the camera aside for a couple of minutes and appreciate what you’re seeing. At night, the curtain of the sky gets pulled back and lets you see the galaxy we live in. Realizing what you’re really looking at is a truly amazing experience once that sinks in. It’s hard to imagine a more inspiring vista than 200 billion stars spread out over 120,000 light years of space. What a view.


This image is not a composite — it is a single image shot using a timer delay. I composed, set the timer, ran out and tried to stand still for the 8 seconds of the exposure. As you might imagine, it took a few tries to get right, but I think it was well worth it.

An Ice Sunset

Andrew here. If you saw my teaser post on the Iceland trip, you already know we didn’t have the most cooperative weather for photography. To be more specific, we had hurricane and “strong gale force” winds, rain, sleet, snow, and/or hail for a lot of the time. This meant we also had a lot of dim, flat, gray light to work with. The one morning we had some good light was one of the days my camera was completely non-functional (more on that another time), so the few shots I have with anything resembling interesting light tend to stand out for me.

This is the famous glacial lagoon of Jokulsarlon in the southeast corner of Iceland. A glacier calves icebergs off into this large body of water, which empties into the sea. The glacier is shrinking rapidly, so the lagoon keeps getting larger. It’s a famous site for photography; you see lots of photos of clear ice on black sand beaches taken near here.

We got there for sunset, which was mostly obscured by heavy clouds but for a brief window when just enough light and color was poking through to get me this scene. Photography frustration aside, I’m happy to say that just being there to see these amazing features is reward enough. That said, I’d be lying if I said I’m not hoping for better light next time…

Father’s Day

Sarah here. I took this picture while walking along Alki Beach (Seattle) on Father’s Day, and it’s been rattling around in my head since then. I finally worked on it this weekend. The moment between these two was so sweet; I’m glad I caught it.

I showed the picture to my mom this morning, and she said, “I bet the two in this picture would love to have it.” Of course, I don’t have any idea who they are. If anyone sees this post and knows them, or if you think you know someone who might know them, please pass it along. The picture was taken on 16 June 2013, on Alki Beach in Seattle, Washington State.

(And if it does make its way to them, please tell me!)

Bragging Rights

Sarah here. Andrew and I hang out on a few photo-related sites, including one called ViewBug, which runs regular photography contests. Since he won’t brag about it, I will… Andrew won the Healthy Lifestyles contest with his picture of kayakers at Silver Falls.

(As an aside, that picture was taken with my old camera –a Nikon D5200– since his D800E was several thousand miles away in the shop for repairs at the time. Just goes to show that you don’t need the fanciest gear to capture great shots; the photographer and the subject matter a lot more than the camera.)

And today, I noticed that ViewBug used Andrew’s shot of Gljúfrabúi – Hidden Falls as the headline picture for their summer photo contest. Ironically, the picture was taken during an Icelandic winter, but never mind. I still commend their taste.

To wrap up with a little joint bragging, the picture on the homepage of Langdon Tactical was a tag-team effort between Andrew and me: Andrew took the picture, and I did the Photoshopping.

Whew… it’s been a busy week! Andrew and I are pretty new at putting our stuff out there, so it’s very exciting to see our work getting some attention!